Audience Feedback: Short Film (Questionnaire)

I decided to create a questionnaire to find out what my audience think about my short film that I have created. I want to find out if there are any things that they don’t like and would change before submitting my film, and also what aspects they like and think work well. I think that it is important for me to do this, in order to get an accurate response from genuine audience members, because they are the people I have aimed these products towards and therefore, I need to be pleasing them. I used Google Docs to do this, because it is a quick and easy way to create a questionnaire and get instant results. In this questionnaire, I asked four questions about my short film. I asked “What do you like about my short film?”, “What don’t you like about my short film?”, “What would you change about my short film?” and finally, “Would you watch this again, and/or recommend this short film to someone else?”.

short film questionnaire

Audience Feedback: Ancillary Texts (Adapted DPS)

Here is the adapted version of my double-page spread, in relation to the opinions of my audience:

double-page-spread-a2 revamped v4.jpg

My audience members suggested making the page numbers smaller, so I changed the font size from 60pt to 36pt, and altered the size of the light grey boxes behind each. Due to the change of size, I found that I had a very obvious gap underneath my first column of text, so I added in another two lines so that I could fill up the space and make sure the page didn’t look too bare. I then realised I also had a noticeable gap above the main body of text, so I decided to add in a star rating, with the words “Enlighten Magazine” in the font “AR CHRISTY Regular” and size 16pt.

I changed the position of the (newly edited) poster; instead of using a stroke, I used an effect called “Outer Glow” in size 125px. I also used this effect behind an information box that I added in on the right hand page to help make that page look a little less bare; in this, I used the font AR DARLING Regular in size 12pt.

On the bottom of the right hand page, I changed the text to say the issue number rather than the name of the magazine, as it was a bit repetitive before, and this helps to make the double-page spread seem more professional.

Audience Feedback: Ancillary Texts (Adapted Poster)

Here is the adapted version of my poster, in relation to the opinions of my audience:

img_7287 4 FINAL POSTER with festivals and tagline

When I asked my audience their opinions of my poster, many people mentioned that the sides of the poster seemed a little blank, however I did not intentionally want to change this as I was hoping this would make the woman in the photograph seem more isolated and alone (although I ended up changing this when responding to their opinions on other aspects of the poster).

Several people brought up the colour of the text and especially mentioned that the release date at the top of the poster didn’t look right. In order to fix this, I took my audiences advice and changed the way this looked; I made the font all capitals and changed it to size 64.61pt (but changed the “TH” to a smaller size of 26.92pt rather than this), then I moved the release date to the left hand side of the poster. To balance this out, I decided that I would use my tagline on the right hand side of the page. The tagline is the same colour and font as the other text on my poster, and it is size 38.7pt. Doing this also help to fix the issue that some audience members had with the fact that it looked too bare at the sides.

 

Audience Feedback: Ancillary Texts (Results)

I sent my questionnaire to a group of my target audience, as well as posting the link on my Twitter, and I got 10 responces within around 48 hours. Here are the answers:

What do you like about my posterWhat don't you like about my posterWhat would you change about my posterIf you saw this, would you want to watch the film - posterWhat do you like about my DPSWhat don't you like about my DPSWhat would you change about my DPSIf you saw this, would you want to watch the film - DPS

In terms of my poster, many people mentioned that the sides of the poster seemed a little blank, several people brought up the colour of the text and especially mentioned that the release date at the top of the poster didn’t look right. I will try and fix these issues by adapting my poster.

In terms of my double-page spread, the only reoccurring issue that my audience brought up was the size of the page numbering that I had used. Some people also mentioned adding in more photographs, but this wouldn’t be easy considering the fact that I am trying to keep the mysterious aspect of the film. I will try and address these issues by adapting my double-page spread.

Audience Feedback: Ancillary Texts (Questionnaire)

I decided to create a questionnaire to find out what my audience think about the poster and double-page spread products that I have created. I want to find out if there are any things that they don’t like and would change before submitting them as my final products, and also what aspects they like and think work well. I think that it is important for me to do this, in order to get an accurate response from genuine audience members, because they are the people I have aimed these products towards and therefore, I need to be pleasing them. I used Google Docs to do these, because it is a quick and easy way to create a questionnaire and get instant results. In this questionnaire, I asked four questions about my poster and four questions about my double-page spread. I asked “What do you like about my poster?”, “What don’t you like about my poster?”, “What would you change about my poster?” “If you saw this, would you want to watch the film?”, “What do you like about my double-page spread?”, “What don’t you like about my double-page spread?”, “What would you change about my double-page spread?” and finally, “If you saw this, would you want to watch the film?”.

This is what the questionnaire looks like:

Audience Feedback Ancillary Texts Questionnaire

X: Film Classifications and Age Ratings

After researching the film classifications and age ratings in the UK and the USA, I decided to see which ratings would be appropriate for my short film, X.

According to the British Board of Film Classification, I think that my short film would be rated as a 12. There are moderate themes of threat and horror throughout the film, however there are no scenes showing illegal drug use, dangerous behaviour that children could imitate, discriminative language, nudity, sex, gore or violence. There is only a hint at bad language at the end of the film, but no actual bad language is used. I do not think a PG rating would be acceptable, as the themes of threat and horror are not counterbalanced with positive natured scenes. On the other hand, I do not think a 15 rating would be acceptable, as my film does not include strong violence, frequent strong langauge, reference or depiction of sexual activity, drug taking or discriminatory langauge and behaviour.

According to the Motion Picture Association of America’s film rating system, I think that my film would be rated as a PG13. Depending on the child, the scenes with themes of threat and horror may be distressing or scary to them. I do not think a PG rating would be acceptable, as some content in the film is inappropriate for younger children. On the other hand, I do not think a R rating would be acceptable, as the film is does not include any scenes of an adult nature.

Film Classifications and Age Ratings (USA)

I decided to research the film classifications and age rating system of the UK and USA, so I could see the difference and how my short may be rated in each country. Here is my research into the USA’s rating system:

mpaa_ratings (2)

In the USA (and its territories), the Motion Picture Association of America’s film rating system is used. However, unlike the UK, there is no law to enforce this, ratings are completely voluntary. Furthermore, films can be shown without having been rated, although cinemas may refuse to show these films. If a film has not been rated by a member of the MPAA, a non-member can submit it to be rated. It is not the only rating system, but is the most commonly used.

According to the MMPA (Motion Picture Association of America):

Classification G – General Audiences:
All ages can watch this film at the cinema, and buy or rent it. Nothing would be included in this film that could offend parents of the children watching.

Classification PG – Parental Guidance Suggested:
Some of the material in this film may not be suitable for some children. Parents are adviced to judge whether the film would be suitable for their child/children or not.

Classification PG13 – Parents Strongly Cautioned:
Some of the material in this film may be inappropriate for children under 13. Parents are adviced to judge whether the film would be suitable for their child/children or not, as some content within the film is likely to not be suitable for pre-teenagers.

Classification R – Restricted:
Anyone under the age of 17 will need to be accompanied by an adult in order to watch this film in the cinema. Under 17’s would not be able to buy or rent a Rated-R film. This film contains some kind of adult material which may be inappropriate for those under 17. A parent would need to seriously consider the content of the film before taking a younger child/ younger children to see it in the cinema.

Classification NC17 – Adults Only/ Suitable for 18 and over:
No one under the age of 18 will be allowed to see this film in the cinema, nor can they buy or rent it. The content of the film is clearly adult and would not be suitable for children or younger teenagers.

Classification NR / Classification UR – Films without ratings:
Not Rated or Un-Rated is the classification for films that have not been rated. This will be shown instead of the rating, or can sometimes simply say “This Film Is Not Rated Yet”.

 

Film Classifications and Age Ratings (UK)

I decided to research the film classifications and age rating system of the UK and USA, so I could see the difference and how my short may be rated in each country. Here is my research into the UK’s rating system:

Age Ratings

According to the BBFC (British Board of Film Classification):

Classification U – Universal, Generally Suitable for All:
A classified U film should be suitable for children aged four and over, although this may depend on the child itself. Any horror, threat and violence is normally counterbalanced with scenes of a positive nature. It is unlikely that discrimination, illegal drugs, bad language, sexual content and anti-social behaviour would be displayed, unless it is highlighted that these actions or objects are bad. Nudity is occasional, as is threat and violence.

Classification PG – Parental Guidance:
A classified PG film should be suitable for children aged eight and over, parents are advised to accompany children when watching but can judge this for themselves in relation to their own children. Any horror, threat and violence is normally counterbalanced with scenes of a positive nature. It is unlikely that discrimination, illegal drugs, sexual content and anti-social behaviour would be displayed, unless it is highlighted that these actions or objects are bad. Nudity is occasional, as is threat and violence. Mild bad language and mild violence may be included. Generally, there will be no behaviour (such as use of weapons and violence) that children are likely to copy.

Classification 12 and Classification 12A – Suitable for 12 years and older:
Children under the age of 12 cannot see a 12A film in the cinema, unless they are accompanied by an adult. If a child is under 12, they cannot buy or rent a film rated 12. Discriminative language and/or actions are unlikely to be included in the film. The use of illegal drugs may be included but will not be glamourised. Dangerous behaviour will also not be glamourised, and is generally only used if it’s unlikely that a child would copy it. There may be nudity, however if it’s of a sexual nature, it will be brief and discreet. Any violent, threat and horror will be moderate; gore will only be used if justified. Moderate language is generally acceptable but will depend on the scene, character and frequency of use.

Classification 15 -Suitable for 15 years and older:
Children under the age of 15 cannot see a 15 film in the cinema, and cannot buy or rent a 15 film. Discriminative language and/or actions will generally not be included but there may be themes such as racism or homophobia. Drug use may be shown but will be shown in an overall negative light, in that it should not promote the use of illegal drugs. However, highly dangerous substances are less likely to be depicted on screen. Strong language is generally acceptable, and very strong language is sometimes used, depending on the person who says it, the situation(s) that is in the film that it’s used in and the frequency that it is used. Nudity in a non-sexual or educational is allowed, however it has to be less detailed if it is of a sexual nature; there may be strong references to sex, but the strongest wouldn’t be acceptable unless justified. Strong threat, horror and violence is generally excepted, unless of a sadistic or sexual nature (the depiction of violent sexual scenes is unlikely to be depicted but detailed verbal references may be included). Any violent will not dwell on the pain of the injuries, and the strongest gore imagery and strong sadism is unlikely to be unacceptable.

Classification 18 – Suitable for adults only:
No one under the age of 18 can see an 18 film in the cinema, and would not be able to buy or rent an 18 film. Unless the scenes breach criminal law or show exceptional levels of sexual or sadistical violence, horror and/or threat, there are no restrictions. Anything unethical, such as scenes that would harm public health or morals (including illegal drug use) may not be acceptable. Sex scenes containing clear images of real sex, strong fetish material, sexually explicit animated images, or other very strong sexual images will generally not be acceptable, but other sexual scenes for either education or arousal are acceptable.

Classification R18 – Suitable for adults only (only shown and found in specific cinemas and shops):
No one under the age of 18 can see an R18 film in the cinema, and would not be able to buy or rent an R18 film. These films can only be shown in specially licensed cinemas and can only be sold in specially licensed sex shops. R18 films depict explict works of consentual sex and strong fetish material (with adults). The material in these film cannot breach criminal law and the material will be judged before publication (Obscene Publications Act 1959). Content in films with this classification that is not acceptable includes; sexual abuse including lack of consent or role-playing of an underage person, pain and acts which cause a lasting physical affect whether it is real or simulated, any penetration from an object that would cause physical harm or is violent, non-consentual sexual threats, non-consentual humiliation and non-consentual abuse. Strong physical or verbal abuse (consentual or non-consentual is unlikely to be acceptable).

X: Short Film (Fourth/ Final Draft)

Here is the fourth and final draft of my short film, X.

Now, I have added in a voiceover, which will hopefully make the film easier to understand for the audience, and should allow the audience to relate to the main character. The voiceover is from the point of view of the main character, and tells the story of the film like a narrated story.

X: Short Film (Third Draft)

Here is the third draft for my short film, X.

In this draft of my film, I added in some music towards the end. I sourced the music from a YouTube channel called FesliyanStudios, and asked permission from the owner to use it within my own film. I then added in a heart beat clip, which I also found on YouTube. I also added in two extra clips in the eye contact scene at the end of the film.

Now, I am going to add in a voiceover, which will make the film much easier to understand for the audience, and will help the audience to relate to the main character; this voiceover will fill the silent areas of the film.